Cosmic Dust: origin, applications & implications

Europe/Copenhagen
Main Auditorium (Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen)

Main Auditorium

Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
Anja C. Andersen (Niels Bohr Institute), Ann Nguyen (NASA Johnson Space Center), Daniel Asmus (ESO), Daniela Calzetti (University of Massachusetts), Darach Watson (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen), Franciska Kemper (Academia Sinica), Haley Gomez (University of Cardiff), J. D. Smith (University of Toledo), Joao Alves (University of Vienna), Karl Gordon (Space Telescope Science Institute), Takaya Nozawa (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan), Thomas Henning (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg)
Description

Registration and poster submission remain open. The call for contributed talks has closed.

#CPHDUST2018

The fourth in a series of conferences held every five years on cosmic dust, following successful meetings in Colorado, USA (2003), in Heidelberg, Germany (2008), and in Taipei, Taiwan (2013).

The Herschel Space Observatory

Despite its fundamental importance to so much of the cosmos, we still do not know where most dust originates, what its mineralogy is, what its properties in different environments are, or its physics and chemistry in the interstellar medium. These questions are under active study, and significant progress has been made over the past decade with new instrumentation, laboratory results, and theoretical modeling.

This conference will bring together experts on dust and dust practitioners from all different backgrounds: meteoritics, interplanetary dust, protoplanets, star-formation, AGB stars and Planetary Nebulae, dust in galaxies, supernovae, and AGN.

The conference is timed to lay out the remarkable progress on dust since the Herschel (pictured above) and Planck missions ended and their legacies have begun to be exploited, since ALMA began real science operations over the previous five years, and to prepare for the launch of JWST.


Invited speakers include:

Susanne Aalto, Almudena Alonso-Herrero, Mike Barlow, Kenji Bekki, John Bradley, Jan Cami, Annalisa De Cia, Ilse De Looze, Carsten Dominik, Bruce Draine, Maud Galametz, Susanne Höfner, Sebastian Hönig, Akio Inoue, Cornelia Jäger, Christine Joblin, Karin Sandstrom, Raffaella Schneider, Matt Smith, Sundar Srinivasan, Zahed Wahhaj, Gail Zasowski

Registration
General registration for CPHDUST2018
Invited Speaker Registration
Organising Committee Registration
Participants
  • Adarsh Ranjan
  • Akio Inoue
  • Alessandra Candian
  • Alexandros Maragkoudakis
  • Alexey Potapov
  • Almudena Alonso-Herrero
  • Anahit Samsonyan
  • Angelos Nersesian
  • Anja C. Andersen
  • Ann Nguyen
  • Annalisa De Cia
  • Antoni Macià
  • Antonia Bevan
  • Arkaprabha Sarangi
  • Birgitta Mueller
  • Brandon Hensley
  • Bruce Draine
  • Carolina Agurto
  • Carsten Dominik
  • Christa Gall
  • Christine Joblin
  • Christopher Clark
  • Ciska Kemper
  • Cornelia Jäger
  • Daniel Asmus
  • Daniele Rogantini
  • Darach Watson
  • Douglas Whittet
  • Dries Van De Putte
  • Edward Jenkins
  • Elisa Costantini
  • Felix Priestley
  • Florian Kirchschlager
  • Francesca Pozzi
  • Francesco Valentino
  • Franziska Schmidt
  • Frederik Doktor Simonsen
  • Gabi Wenzel
  • Gail Zasowski
  • Gaël Rouillé
  • Gen Chiaki
  • Georgios Magdis
  • Georgios Pantazidis
  • Haley Gomez
  • Hannah Chawner
  • Harald Mutschke
  • I-Da Chiang
  • Ian Mccheyne
  • Ilse De Looze
  • Ioanna Psaradaki
  • Jan Cami
  • Jarron Leisenring
  • JD Smith
  • Jens Hjorth
  • Jeremy Chastenet
  • Joel Johansson
  • Johan Fynbo
  • John Bradley
  • John Thrower
  • Jonas Greif
  • jose angel Martin Gago
  • Julia Roman-Duval
  • Karin Sandstrom
  • Karl Gordon
  • Karl Misselt
  • Kasper Heintz
  • Katarzyna Malek
  • Kengo Tachihara
  • Kenji Bekki Bekki
  • kuan-chou Hou
  • Kwang-il Seon
  • Lapo Fanciullo
  • Lia Corrales
  • Lizette Guzman-Ramirez
  • Luca Graziani
  • Marcin Gladkowski
  • Marco Tazzari
  • Maria Kirsanova
  • Maria Murga
  • Maria Niculescu-Duvaz
  • Marjorie Decleir
  • Mark Walker
  • Martin Glatzle
  • Masashi Nashimoto
  • Matthew Shannon
  • Matthew Smith
  • Matthias Maercker
  • Maud Galametz
  • Meriem El Yajouri
  • Mikako Matsuura
  • Mike Barlow
  • Minjae Kim
  • Missagh Mehdipour
  • Mohammadtaher Safarzadeh
  • Monica Relano Pastor
  • Monique Aller
  • NAOUAL DJOUHRI
  • Pablo Merino
  • Patricia Luppe
  • Peter Laursen
  • Petia Yanchulova Merica-Jones
  • Phil Cigan
  • Raffaella Schneider
  • Ralf Siebenmorgen
  • Rijutha Jaganathan
  • Robert Brunngräber
  • Roger Wesson
  • Rosie Beeston
  • Ryo Tazaki
  • Rémi Bérard
  • Sami Dib
  • Sara Bladh
  • Sascha Zeegers
  • Sebastian Hoenig
  • Serge Krasnokutski
  • Shohei Ishiki
  • Shubhadip CHAKRABORTY
  • Sihao Cheng
  • Sofie Liljegren
  • Stefan Bromley
  • Steve Goldman
  • Sundar Srinivasan
  • Susanne Aalto
  • Susanne Höfner
  • Svitlana Zhukovska
  • Sébastien Viaene
  • Takaya Nozawa
  • Takuma Kokusho
  • Thiébaut Schirmer
  • Thomas Boutéraon
  • Thomas Henning
  • Troels Haugbølle
  • Vincent Guillet
  • Yoshinobu Fudamoto
  • Young-Soo Jo
  • Zahed Wahhaj
Contact info for the conference
    • 09:00 09:15
      Welcome and introduction 15m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Conference opening and welcome

    • 09:15 10:35
      Non-stellar dust production and the dust cycle in the ISM Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 09:15
        Non-stellar dust production and the dust cycle in the ISM 45m

        Abstract here

        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Margaret Meixner (Space Telescope Science Institute)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 10:00
        Non-stellar dust production and the dust cycle in the ISM 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Prof. Kenji Bekki (University of Western Australia)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Kenji Bekki (University of Western Australia)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 10:35 10:50
      Poster Presentations: Poster Presentations #1 Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Quick presentation of posters

    • 10:50 11:15
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 11:15 12:30
      Non-stellar dust production and the dust cycle in the ISM Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 11:15
        Probing dust properties in the LMC from UV to FIR 20m

        Interstellar dust is a key component of galaxy evolution owing to its crucial role in the chemistry and radiative transfer in galaxies. Our interpretation of extragalactic SEDs and our understanding of galaxy evolution thus critically depend on an accurate characterization of how the dust content and properties vary within and between galaxies. Recent observations suggest that dust grains must grow in the ISM to explain dust masses over cosmic times (Rowlands et al. 2014), leading to changes in the abundance, composition, size, and optical properties of dust grains with environment (e.g., density, metallicity, dynamics). In this talk, I will present results from two recent efforts to characterize the dust properties in the Magellanic Clouds. First, an analysis of the gas-to-dust ratio variations in the LMC and SMC (with metallicities 0.5 and 0.2 solar, respectively) based on the stacking and modeling of the resolved SED from all-sky FIR surveys (IRAS and Planck at 100, 350, 550, and 850 ? m) suggests that the dust abundances increases by factors 3-7 between the diffuse ISM and dense molecular clouds (Roman-Duval et al. 2017). Second, the large Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program METAL (Metal Evolution, Transport, and Abundance in the LMC - GO-14675, 101 orbits, Roman-Duval et al., in prep) is delivering its first large sample of interstellar depletions at half-solar metallicity toward 33 massive stars in the LMC. The gas-phase abundances of the key components of dust grains (Si, Mg, Fe, Ni, Ti) but also other volatile elements (Zn, S) strongly support dust growth in the ISM via accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains. Depletion patterns however differ between the Milky Way, the LMC, and SMC, with the dust-to-metal ratio offsetting almost exactly the metallicity differences, leading to constant gas-phase metallicities in those galaxies. Additionally, parallel WFC3 imaging obtained as part of METAL allow us to derive high-resolution extinction maps, which can be directly compared to FIR emission seen in Spitzer and Herschel to characterize the FIR dust emissivity. Preliminary results suggest that the emissivity of dust could increase by a factor 3 between the diffuse ISM and denser molecular regions, likely due to coagulation. These results have important implications for the sub-grid modeling of galaxy evolution, and for the calibration of dust-based gas mass estimates used for star-formation studies, both locally and at high-redshift.

        Speaker: Julia Roman-Duval (Space Telescope Science Institute)
    • 12:30 12:45
      Poster Presentations: Poster Presentations #2 Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Quick presentation of posters

    • 12:45 14:00
      Lunch 1h 15m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:00 15:20
      Dust production in low mass stars Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 14:00
        Dust production in low- and intermediate-mass stars 45m

        Stars in their late stages of evolution are generally considered to be major sources of interstellar dust. However, there is a long standing debate over the relative contributions by massive stars (both before and after they explode as supernovae), compared to low- and intermediate-mass stars, which expel a significant fraction of their total mass in stellar winds during the cool giant phase. In this talk I will focus on the latter process, discussing state-of-the-art models of dust-driven winds and, in particular, results regarding dust production.

        Speaker: Prof. Susanne Höfner (Uppsala University)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Susanne Höfner (Uppsala University)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 14:45
        Dust production in low mass stars 35m

        Outflows from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and red supergiant (RSG) stars regulate the lifecycle of dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) in nearby galaxies. Metals produced in AGB nucleosynthesis are transported to the surface where they cool to form molecules and, further out, dust. The chemistry of this material depends on the surface atomic ratio of carbon to oxygen, resulting in either silicate-rich or carbonaceous dust.

        Detailed radiative transfer is required to accurately model each AGB star; however, for a large sample such as the entire population in a galaxy, this becomes time-consuming. Astronomers thus either use proxies for the dust-production rate (DPR) such as the mid-infrared colour or the infrared excess. Along with my collaborators, I developed the Grid of RSG and AGB ModelS (GRAMS; Sargent et al. 2011 ApJ 728 93, Srinivasan et al. 2011 A\&A 532A 54), which can be used for quick estimates of the DPRs of a large sample via $\chi^2$ fits to their spectral energy distributions (SEDs).

        We have used this model grid to compute the dust budget in the Large (Riebel et al. 2012 ApJ 753 71) and Small (Srinivasan et al. 2016 MNRAS 457 2814) Magellanic Clouds, and are also in the process of estimating the dust budget in M33 and NGC 6822 (Srinivasan et al., in prep). As part of the Nearby Evolved Stars Survey (NESS), we are also determining the dust budget within 2 kpc of the Solar Neighbourhood (Trejo et al., in prep; see poster by Dr. Ciska Kemper).

        When combined with results for Local Group dwarfs (DUSTINGs; Boyer et al. 2015 ApJS 216 10), we now have dust budget information over six decades in total stellar mass and seven decades in integrated DPR. I will describe our methods and findings in this talk.

        Speaker: Dr. Sundar Srinivasan (Academia Sinica)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Sundar Srinivasan (Academia Sinica)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 15:20 15:35
      Poster Presentations: Poster Presentations #3 Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Quick presentation of posters

    • 15:35 16:00
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 16:00 17:15
      Dust production in low mass stars Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 17:15 17:30
      Poster Presentations: Poster Presentations #4 Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Quick presentation of posters

    • 09:00 10:20
      Dust production by supernovae and massive stars Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 09:00
        Dust production by supernovae and massive stars 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Prof. Mike Barlow (University College London)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Mike Barlow (University College London)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 09:45
        Dust production by supernovae and massive stars 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Ilse De Looze (Universiteit Gent - University College London)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Ilse De Looze (University College London)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 10:20 10:35
      Poster Presentations: Poster Presentations #5 Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Quick presentation of posters

    • 10:35 11:00
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 11:00 12:40
      Dust production by supernovae and massive stars Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 12:40 14:00
      Lunch 1h 20m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:00 14:15
      Poster Presentations: Poster Presentations #6 Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Quick presentation of posters

    • 14:15 15:35
      Observational constraints on dust properties Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 14:15
        Observational constraints on dust properties 35m

        Enter abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Annalisa De Cia (ESO)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Annalisa De Cia (ESO)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 14:50
        Observational constraints on dust properties 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Prof. Bruce Draine (Princeton University)
    • 15:35 16:00
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 16:00 16:50
      Observational constraints on dust properties Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 16:50 17:15
      Molecules and dust: Molecules and Dust Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 09:00 10:20
      Molecules and dust: Molecules and Dust Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 09:00
        From Molecules to Dust (and back) 45m

        Throughout the Universe, there is a close interplay between the formation, evolution and destruction of dust grains and molecules, driven by the diverse conditions encountered in various astrophysical environments. When stellar gas cools down in the surroundings of evolved stars, it starts a transformation into molecular gas and dust grains. The resulting inventory depends not only on the chemical makeup of the stellar photosphere, but also on the physical conditions and available timescales. Dense tori and disks can offer long timescales for chemistry and grain growth, while photo-processing by stellar and interstellar radiation further drives molecular chemistry and dust erosion as stellar outflows are dispersed into the interstellar medium. In interstellar environments, dust grains and large molecules can offer their surfaces to facilitate the formation of molecules, and a particularly rich molecular chemistry occurs in the ice mantles on dust grains in molecular clouds. Near hot stars, intense radiation fields create harsh conditions where UV photons destroy all but the fittest of molecular species.

        In this talk, I will present an overview of the environments where molecules and dust reside, and the physical and chemical processes that affect them.

        Speaker: Prof. Jan Cami (University of Western Ontario)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Jan Cami (University of Western Ontario)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 09:45
        From molecules to dust 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Gail Zasowski (University of Utah)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Gail Zasowski (University of Utah)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 10:20 10:50
      Break 30m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 10:50 12:35
      Laboratory studies of cosmic dust: Laboratory studies of dust Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 10:50
        Laboratory studies of dust 45m

        Your abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Cornelia Jäger (University of Jena)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Cornelia Jäger (University of Jena)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 11:35
        How laboratory experiments can help in studying cosmic PAHs 35m

        Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are commonly thought to play a key role in the chemical and physical evolution of star-forming regions from the small scales of protoplanetary disks to the large scales of galaxies. However attempts to identify individual species have been so far unsuccessful. Cosmic PAHs and related species such as C$_{60}$, are observed by their emission features in the mid-infrared, the so-called aromatic infrared bands (AIBs). Emission in the AIBs is triggered by the absorption of VUV photons but this process can also induce ionisation and unimolecular dissociation. The composition of the IR-emitting population might therefore reflect this processing. In addition the formation routes of these large carbonaceous molecules have still to be elucidated. Several scenarios including bottom-up and top-down ones have been proposed.

        In my presentation, I will discuss how this subject takes benefit from laboratory astrophysics. The photophysics of isolated PAHs, including ionisation, dissociation and radiative cooling is studied with different setups (molecular jets, ion traps, storage rings) and makes use of VUV tunable synchrotron radiation [1-6]. The question of the formation by gas-phase condensation of PAHs and carbonaceous grains in circumstellar environments has been discussed following experiments that use techniques such as laser ablation, laser pyrolysis or plasma discharges [7-9]. Recently, the Stardust machine in Madrid [10] has been developed to study grain formation in conditions that approach those found in Asymptotic Giant Branch star environment. The molecular analysis of laboratory analogues of cosmic dust, combined with that of extraterrestrial samples such as meteorites, is expected to provide new insights into chemical pathways leading to the formation of cosmic PAHs. I will describe how this topic is addressed in the framework of the Nanocosmos ERC Synergy project using in particular the AROMA setup [11].

        References
        [1] B. West, S. Rodriguez Castillo, A. Sit, S. Mohamad, B. Lowe, C. Joblin, A. Bodi and P. M. Mayer, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 20, 7195 (2018).
        [2] C. Joblin, L. Dontot, G.A. Garcia, F. Spiegelman, M. Rapacioli, L. Nahon, P. Parneix, T. Pino, P. Bréchignac, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 8, 3697–3702 (2017).
        [3] G. Rouillé, S. A. Krasnokutski, D. Fulvio, C. Jäger, Th. Henning, G. A. Garcia, X.-F. Tang, L. Nahon, Astrophys. J. 810, id. 114 (2015).
        [4] J. Zhen, S. Rodriguez Castillo, C. Joblin, G. Mulas, H. Sabbah, A. Giuliani, L. Nahon, S.Martin, J.-P. Champeaux, P. Mayer, Astrophys. J. 822, id. 113 (2016).
        [5] J. Zhen, P. Castellanos, D. M. Paardekooper, N. Ligterink, H. Linnartz, L. Nahon, C. Joblin, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J. Lett. 804, L7 (2015).
        [6] S. Martin, M. Ji, J. Bernard, R. Brédy, B. Concina, A. R. Allouche, C. Joblin, C. Ortega, A. Cassimi, Y. Ngono-ravache, and L. Chen, Phys. Rev. A 92, id.053425 (2015).
        [7] H. W. Kroto, J. R. Heath, S. C. O'Brien, R. F. Curl, R. E. Smalley, Nature 318, 162-163 (1985).
        [8] C. Jäger, F. Huisken, H. Mutschke, I. Llamas Jansa,, Th. Henning, Astrophys. J. 696, 706-712 (2009).
        [9] C. S. Contreras, F. Salama, Astrophys. J. Supp. 208, id. 6 (2013).
        [10] L. Martínez, K. Lauwaet, G. Santoro, J. M. Sobrado, R. J. Peláez, V. J. Herrero, I. Tanarro, G. Ellis, J. Cernicharo, C. Joblin, Y. Huttel, J. A. Martín-Gago, subm (2017) and this conference.
        [11] H. Sabbah, A. Bonnamy, D. Papanastasiou, J. Cernicharo, , J.-A. Martín-Gago, C. Joblin, Astrophys. J. 843, id. 34 (2017).

        Acknowledgement
        We acknowledge support from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme ERC-2013-SyG, Grant Agreement n. 610256 NANOCOSMOS.

        Speaker: Christine Joblin
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 12:35 14:00
      Lunch 1h 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:00 14:25
      Laboratory studies of cosmic dust: Laboratory studies of dust Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:25 15:35
      Dust in the solar system: Dust in the Solar System Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 14:25
        Dust in the solar system 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. John Bradley (University of Hawaii)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. John Bradley (University of Hawaii)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 15:35 16:00
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 16:00 17:30
      Panel Discussion 1h 30m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark

      Panel discussion on something

    • 18:30 22:30
      Conference Dinner 4h Festsalen (University of Copenhagen)

      Festsalen

      University of Copenhagen

      Frue Plads 4, 1168 København K
    • 09:00 10:45
      Grain growth, planet formation and debris disks: Grain growth, planet formation, and debris disks Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 09:00
        Grain growth, planet formation and debris disks 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Prof. Carsten Dominik (University of Amsterdam)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Carsten Dominik (University of Amsterdam)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 09:45
        Grain growth, planet formation and debris disks 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Zahed Wahhaj (ESO)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Zahed Wahhaj (ESO)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 10:45 11:15
      Break 30m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 11:15 12:35
      Dust as a tracer in the Milky Way and local galaxies Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 11:15
        Dust as a tracer in the Milky Way and local galaxies 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Maud Galametz (CEA Saclay)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Maud Galametz (CEA Saclay)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 12:00
        Dust as a tracer in the Milky Way and local galaxies 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Matt Smith (University of Cardiff)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Matt Smith (University of Cardiff)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 12:35 14:00
      Lunch 1h 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:00 14:50
      Dust as a tracer in the Milky Way and local galaxies Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:50 15:35
      Dust as a galaxy probe Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 14:50
        Dust as a galaxy probe 45m
        Speaker: Prof. Susanne Aalto (Chalmers University of Technology)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Susanne Aalto (Chalmers University of Technology)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 15:35 16:00
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 16:00 17:25
      Dust as a galaxy probe Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 16:00
        Dust as a galaxy probe 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Karin Sandstrom (University of California, San Diego)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Karin Sandstrom (University of California, San Diego)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 09:00 10:45
      Dust in AGN Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 09:00
        Dust in AGN 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Prof. Almudena Alonso-Herrero (INTA-CSIC)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Almudena Alonso-Herrero (INTA-CSIC)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

      • 09:45
        Dust in AGN 35m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Dr. Sebastian Hönig (University of Southampton)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Dr. Sebastian Hönig (University of Southampton)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 10:45 11:15
      Break 30m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 11:15 11:40
      Dust in AGN Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 11:40 12:25
      Dust in the early universe Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 11:40
        Dust in the early universe 45m

        Abstract here

        Speaker: Prof. Raffaella Schneider (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF)
        • Talk 35m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Raffaella Schneider (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 12:25 14:00
      Lunch 1h 35m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 14:00 15:25
      Dust in the early universe Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
      • 14:00
        Dust and elements in the epoch of reionization 35m

        First, I will present our recent results from ALMA observations of galaxies in the epoch of reionization, redshifts $z>6$. Second, I will present a method for estimating the dust temperature from far-infrared flux densities, taking the radiative equilibrium and transfer effect into account. Then, I will present a demographics study of dust mass in $z>6$ galaxies and compare the observations with a simple theoretical model. I will pay attention to "dust-free" objects as well as dust-rich ones. Finally, I will discuss the dust mass growth in the interstellar medium and future perspective.

        Speaker: Prof. Akio Inoue (Osaka Sangyo University)
        • Talk 25m

          Talk period

          Speaker: Prof. Akio Inoue (Osaka Sangyo University)
        • Discussion 10m

          Discussion period

    • 15:25 15:50
      Break 25m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 15:50 16:15
      Dust in the early universe Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
    • 16:15 16:45
      Conference Summary and Review 30m Main Auditorium

      Main Auditorium

      Geological Museum, University of Copenhagen

      Øster Voldgade 5 - 7, 1350 København K, Denmark
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